“The Judaism we are looking for can be found at IJS.”

— Audrey Brooks

Posts Tagged: Rosh Hashanah

After the Holidays

sunrise over mountainI find it so curious that the Jewish year begins with almost an entire month’s worth of holidays, each one with its own flavor, building upon the one before.  We have the sweet awe of Rosh Hashanah, the intense internality of Yom Kippur, the joy and vulnerability of Sukkot, the ecstatic connection to learning on Simchat Torah.  It is quite a spiritual journey – and can be exhausting!  I hear many people expressing relief that the holidays are “finally” behind us.

Which brings us to that seemingly flat time of “after the holidays.”  Life is back to normal (whatever that means).  We return to the routine and the steadily increasing darkness of the Northern Hemisphere’s approaching winter.  Next week we begin the new month of Heshvan, the famous month of no holidays.  Sometimes it is known as “Marheshvan,” with a connotation of mar or bitterness.  There is no external reason to celebrate; there is nothing obviously interesting or intriguing about it.   In some ways, the whole month is the continuation of Shemini Atzeret, the eighth day of Sukkot, which has only one unique feature in the Diaspora:  the prayer for rain for the Land of Israel.

And yet, in some ways, these weeks are actually the fruitful time of the year, not the dramatic holiday season just ended.  We get to begin living out what we thought, embodying the insights, intentions and hopes for the new year.  We get to begin translating the lofty visions into messy, ever-surprising life.  It may be dark; it may be rainy; it may be unexciting.  But moving from the potential to the actual is filled with power and possibility.

This is precisely where spiritual practice has the most to offer, in offering perspective and wisdom when confronted with difficulty and in guiding us towards more kindness, responsibility, gratitude and integrity.   It can even help us find the unexpected shining in ordinary things.  There is nothing bitter about that!

Wishing everyone a mindful transition back to the everyday!

Days of Awe and Compassion

Elul is coming to an end with the grandeur and mystery of the High Holy Days about to begin.  In New York the weather shifted this week too; the sun is still warm, but the wind is fresh and even chilly, signs of colder days approaching.

Last week I mentioned the new building that is being constructed outside our windows.  I have been watching the workers, climbing, moving and hammering, seemingly without a care, on the drop-off edge of a concrete slab 20 stories above the street.  As I write, one man in a neon green vest is clinging to the outside of a plywood ladder, nothing underneath him but a net two floors below, whacking at something with a tool.  He is clipped on with a harness, but from here, it looks pretty terrifying.

Fear.  I remember studying once with Gabe Goldman, a naturalist and Jewish educator.  He told of having led a hands-on workshop about how to handle very, very sharp knives, so sharp that you wouldn’t even feel it if you cut off your finger.  He taught his students how to hold them, work with them, and respect them.  He then followed the workshop with a lesson about yirah, “fearing” or being “in awe” of God.

After the sweet, mellow days of Elul, these High Holy Days, Days of Awe, give us a glimpse of something stronger and a little more fearful.  They encourage us to consider the mystery of the unknown days ahead, days that may hold great blessings and great suffering, and probably a little of both.  They give us the forum to come face to face with our limits and the reality of our mortality.  They challenge us to confront our own vulnerability in the face of the colder days that are coming.

But, like the men outside who are building a new building, a structure that will provide shelter for hundreds of people and stand witness to their labors for many years, the High Holy Days also give us the opportunity to take satisfaction in the work of our hands and to find joy in living this life, in company with fellow travelers, step by dangerous step, even when we feel we are dangling over the abyss.

May 5773 bring all of us more blessings than suffering, more expansiveness than constriction, more peace than conflict, and more joy than sorrow.   May our practices give us tools for wisdom, gratitude and compassion.  And may we find good companions (or a good Companion) for the journey who can support us with courage, love and guidance.

Walking in the Fields

South of Caesarea on the Israel Trail

 

Summer is winding down.  Elul begins on Saturday night.  The beginning of Elul reminds me of a story I heard from Rabbi Sholom Rivkin (of blessed memory), a kind and learned man who was the Chief Rabbi of St. Louis for many years.

Rabbi Rivkin told that in the old days, if you wanted to go talk to the king, you had to think about who could help you get invited to the palace.  You had to wear your best clothes and learn the court etiquette – how to enter the throne room, when to bow, what to say, where to look.  It was all very complicated and very serious.  But sometimes, the king just went for a walk in the fields.  And at those times, anyone could just start walking along next to the king and share whatever was on their heart.

Elul is the season when the King goes walking in the fields.

I love this story – the imagery, the intimacy, the hope it conveys for coming close to the Divine.  I feel my heart leap up:  Yes!  I too want to go for a walk with the King!  (or the Queen – pick your metaphor of royalty.)  I want that immediate access, the instant connection.  So often I focus on learning the court ritual, or, as we say, “preparing the vessel” – committing to the form of the ritual, dragging my attention back over and over.  I know that the practice is a tool that can create the possibility for those moments of awareness.  Yet I yearn for those moments of grace.

I also love this story because the High Holy Days themselves are like the throne room, not like the open fields.  They are arguably the most formal, complicated and serious days of our whole year.  We (especially we clergy) could get seduced into thinking that the preparation for these Days of Awe is mostly involved with liturgy and choreography.  But this is precisely when God invites greater accessibility of a very different kind.

And so part of my preparation for the Holy Days includes imagining:

  • What would it be like if I could join God for that walk in the fields?
  • How would I say hello?
  • What would I share about my life?
  • What would I ask for?
  • What questions would I be asked?
  • How would I answer?
  • How would I take my leave?

Wishing you an inspiring, heart-opening beginning to these most holy of days!